Chalcogenide Glass

Micron PCM Enters Mass Production

Cover of Electronics Magazine, 28 September, 1970, with Intel PCM articleAfter years of prototyping Micron Technology claims to be the first to introduce production volumes of Phase-Change Memory, or PCM.  This memory, also known as PRAM, has long been positioned as a contender to replace flash once flash reaches its scaling limit.  Rather than use electrons to store a bit, PCM uses a type of glass that is conductive when in a crystalline state and resistive when amorphous, two states that are relatively easy to control.  The size of the bits can shrink to a very small dimensions, allowing PCM to scale into the single-digit number of nanometers, which most folks today believe to be beyond the realm of flash.

This product began its life at Intel, then followed the Numonyx spin-off, and was taken over by Micron when it acquired Numonyx.  In fact, Intel got into PCM very early on – this post’s graphic is the cover of an Electronics Magazine from September 1970 with an Intel story, written by Gordon Moore, telling about a 128-bit PCM research chip.

So far only three companies have produced samples Continue reading

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