Finally! A Real Virtual Memory Chip

A big red letter X over a box marked MMUAt long last a chip has been embodied to simplify the use of virtual memory, a computing architecture that has been in use since the 1960s. The Memory Guy was given a sneak peek at this new approach by no other than Olly Mugwump, a highly-respected computer architect and longstanding member and fellow of several important technical societies.  The new design promises to accelerate memory accesses while Continue reading “Finally! A Real Virtual Memory Chip”

Processing-In-Memory, 1960s-Style

Famous photo of Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin on the moon.There’s a surge of interest these days in Processing in Memory or PIM.  Some call it “Compute in Memory.”  Either way, it often involves adding small amounts of logic to a memory chip to allow it to offload tasks from the CPU.

There are various reasons to do this.  The most important is that PIM frees the CPU to do other chores.  PIM also can reduce Continue reading “Processing-In-Memory, 1960s-Style”

Weebit Moves Ahead Step-By-Step

Green box with three prongs sticking out o each side to abstractly imply a packaged chip.In the world of startups it’s unusual to see one that disciplines itself to a steady cadence of consistent execution.   Countless times The Memory Guy blog has profiled companies that perform some important feat, and then fail to repeat that success.  With that background it’s refreshing to see a company that methodically moves in a straight line towards its goal.

The company I am talking about today is Continue reading “Weebit Moves Ahead Step-By-Step”

World Record ReRAM and More

Photo of Ron Neale, Renowned Phase-Change Memory ExpertRon Neale joins us to look at a new World Record for Oxide-ReRAMs.  Here he explores the possibility that, rather than an analogue-like device with a continuum of conduction states, the resolution limit of conductance stems from discrete building blocks or nano-filaments that define the changes between those states.  A dichotomy of views on oxide ReRAM operation is part of the mix.


For Oxide ReRAM watchers, one of the highlights of the first half of 2023 was Continue reading “World Record ReRAM and More”

In Memoriam: Gordon Moore

Photo of Gordon Moore in the 1970sToday Gordon Moore, a figurehead in the semiconductor industry, passed away at 94 years of age.  He will be sorely missed by the semiconductor industry.

Moore, the namesake of Moore’s Law, cofounded both Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel Corporation.  He was an unassuming genius and visionary who, as a part of Intel’s leadership triumvirate in the company’s main growth phase, provided Continue reading “In Memoriam: Gordon Moore”

A Very Revealing ULTRARAM Update

Photo of Ron Neale, Renowned Phase-Change Memory ExpertContributor Ron Neale returns to The Memory Guy blog with a deeper analysis of the University of Lancaster’s ULTRARAM, which was first announced relatively recently, in early 2020.  This post includes his revealing interchange with the university’s Professor Manus Hayne, a key member of the ULTRARAM program, in which the professor indicates that GaAs ICs and Chiplets might be the way ahead for this technology.

Ron tells me that this is the first mention that he is aware of for Continue reading “A Very Revealing ULTRARAM Update”

The Future of Chalcogenide Switching

Photo of Ron Neale, Renowned Phase-Change Memory ExpertIn this post in The Memory Guy blog, the first of a 2-part series, Ron Neale returns to explore the present state-of-play for chalcogenide-based switching and memory, with a plea for continuation of research.  Along the way he invokes a three-point law for determining the probability of success for would be emerging memory entrepreneurs.


Does PCM still have a chance to become an important new memory technology?  Intel’s abandonment of their Optane memory project, while sad, after so much effort and expense, does not and should not Continue reading “The Future of Chalcogenide Switching”

Emerging Memories After Optane

Prism made of memory hierarchy splitting a beam of light into a color spectrum. Each color has the name of a new memory technology.Now that Intel is exiting the Optane market what will happen to the market for new memory technologies?  This is an interesting question that The Memory Guy has focused considerable attention over the past few years.  In a nutshell, the market will continue to develop, but at a slower pace, with the bulk of revenue growth going to memories embedded into SoCs.

Even so, the market will grow significantly, with revenues reaching Continue reading “Emerging Memories After Optane”

ReRAMs find a Neuromorphic Role in Owl-Inspired Object Location

Photo of Ron Neale, Renowned Phase-Change Memory ExpertIn his latest post on The Memory Guy, contributor Ron Neale reviews a novel use for ReRAM cells in which a neural processing system mimics the direction-finding mechanism of a barn owl’s ears.  This is based on research performed by CEA-Leti in France, which was recently published in the journal Nature.


The potential for the use of the unique characteristics of ReRAMs, PCM and CeRAMs as brain-gates, neuromorphic devices, and in-memory computation has long been recognised.

In a paper recently published in Nature , inspired by the auditory system of the barn owl, a team from: CEA-Leti, Continue reading “ReRAMs find a Neuromorphic Role in Owl-Inspired Object Location”

CeRAM: Some Significant New Insights

Photo of Ron Neale, Renowned Phase-Change Memory ExpertIn this post contributor Ron Neale takes a very deep look into a new paper published by Symetrix,  Cerfe Labs  and university researchers which provides fresh insights to the inner workings of CeRAM (Correlated electron RAM), an innovative class of non-volatile memory, where carbon doping of nickel oxide NiO leads to a new type of electronics based electron interaction.  With the recently-disclosed material as background, he then adopts the position of Devil’s Advocate to explore alternative views of the memory switching mechanism and to test the proposition that CeRAM is not simply another kind of ReRAM.


A new and recently published paper in APL Materials [1] by a team from the University of Colorado, Symetrix Corporation, Cerfe Labs, The Katholieke University Belgium, Federal University of Rio de Janerio Brazil, and the University of Colorado and more recently [2] have provided us with some important Continue reading “CeRAM: Some Significant New Insights”