Processing-In-Memory, 1960s-Style

Famous photo of Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin on the moon.There’s a surge of interest these days in Processing in Memory or PIM.  Some call it “Compute in Memory.”  Either way, it often involves adding small amounts of logic to a memory chip to allow it to offload tasks from the CPU.

There are various reasons to do this.  The most important is that PIM frees the CPU to do other chores.  PIM also can reduce Continue reading “Processing-In-Memory, 1960s-Style”

Samsung’s Aquabolt-XL Processor-In-Memory (Part 1)

Sketch of a sledgehammer driving a wedge into a logFor the past year, since ISSCC in February 2021, Samsung has been strongly promoting its “Aquabolt-XL” Processor-In-Memory (PIM) devices.  In this two-part post The Memory Guy will explain the Aquabolt-XL architecture, its performance, other companies’ similar devices, and discuss the PIM approach’s outlook for commercial success.

Processing in memory is not a Continue reading “Samsung’s Aquabolt-XL Processor-In-Memory (Part 1)”

UPMEM Releases Processor-In-Memory Benchmark Results

Chip layout of Micron's Automata ProcessorOn January 22 Processor-In-Memory (PIM) maker UPMEM announced what the company claims are: “The first silicon-based PIM benchmarks.”  These benchmarks indicate that a Xeon server that has been equipped with UPMEM’s PIM DIMM can perform eleven times as many five-word string searches through 128GB of DRAM in a given amount of time as the Xeon processor can perform on its own.  The company tells us that this provides significant energy savings: the server consumes only one sixth the energy of a standard system.  By using algorithms that have been optimized for parallel processing UPMEM claims to be able to process these searches up to 35 times as quickly as a conventional system.

Furthermore, the same system with an UPMEM PIM is said to Continue reading “UPMEM Releases Processor-In-Memory Benchmark Results”